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In The Midnight Lands

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28. Wounded and mighty.

Izzy_Indigo

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THE BASS dropped. The strobes detonated.

Chaos.

Bang. Flash. Bang. Flash. Bang ban b b b b bbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb.

The track soared, a wave standing tall. Everybody now dancing, peaking - DOOF - duda - DOOF - duda - DOOF - lights pulsing, pure white convulsing.

The entire Trance Zone seared, thousands upon thousands flash frozen in euphoria under glittering slopes of rain: bent limbs and grins and grimaces and shrieks and howls and smirks and smooches and tears.

The emotion of it all pounding into us, and in, and in, until wounded and mighty we were roaring at the top of our lungs. Roaring. Roaring. Our cry reaching up and out to traverse the zone until everywhere, everyone wailed. It was five to midnight and magic as nothing I'd ever experienced before.

Slowly the track faded. The lights died. The hum of the crowd filled the void, until this too dissolved. Quiet. Wet. Then, a voice. Booming across the Zone.

TEN,

NINE,

EIGHT,

We all took it up,

SEVEN,

SIX,

FIVE,

Everybody yelling,

FOUR,

THREE,

TWO,

Everyone ecstatic,

ONE,

An eruption ripped through the cauldron,

HAPPY NEW YEARS!

We closed for back slaps and handshakes, we closed for hugs and kisses, we closed with friends and strangers alike, all family now. A conch shell echoed across the clearing. An undulating voice in Maori called the 2000s in. Fireworks exploded their tracery across the sky.

Long and lasting, light-filled minutes.

It was only after, after we'd tumbled down this supreme peak, that we realised crew were missing. Darius had lost his wards. Tim and Sandra were nowhere to be found.

* * * *

This blog is a story. Each post picks up from the last.

If you are new, start at the bottom with post 1 and then work your way up. 

:)

* * * *

Enjoying what you're reading? Please take the time to follow the blog, like and comment.

Your support means a lot.

Also, sharing is caring. 

:)

* * * *

 

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