Jump to content
×
  • Contributors Wanted!

    We are always looking for writers and photographers with initiative, passion and creativity from all around the country to get involved and help us build Australia's newest electronic music community.
    If you think you have the passion to get your work seen by many people every day, apply to be a contributor 

    Apply Now

  • Sign in to follow this  

    An Australian dance classic has just been given new life


    InTheMix

    If you were pushed to name just one track that has defined the Australian dance landscape, there’s a good chance you’d answer ‘Sweetness & Light‘.

    The 1993 track by Sydney producers Paul Mac and Andy Rantzen — known as Itch-E & Scratch-E — not only perfectly captured the essence of the vibrant underground dance culture, but also introduced this culture to audiences that had never experienced it before.

    ‘Sweetness & Light’ exploded into the mainstream, landing at #21 in triple j’s Hottest 100 and taking home the first ever ARIA award for Best Dance Release in 1995. Infamously, Mac used his acceptance speech to “thank all of Sydney’s ecstasy dealers, without whom this award would not be possible.”

    Even 24 years later, ‘Sweetness & Light’ still has the power to pull even the toughest wallflowers on to the dancefloor. And now the track has been given a new life, with local label Motorik giving it a fresh remaster and a vinyl release.

    “The re-release of ‘Sweetness & Light’ kicked off when our artist For Life did a bootleg remix for their live show,” Motorik manager Declan Piggott told inthemix. “We were so struck by how faithful it was to the original we knew it had to be released.

    “We knew the only way we could release it on vinyl was to own the license. Fortunately the licensing gods were kind to us where the previously copyright owners license had expired. So we jumped on what feels like a once in a life time opportunity to pay homage to key members of Sydney’s underground history.”

    To complement the release, Motorik grabbed some time with Mac and Rantzen to discuss the track’s legacy, Sydney’s dance history, and whether a track like ‘Sweetness & Light’ could exist in today’s scene. See what they had to say below.

    The post An Australian dance classic has just been given new life appeared first on inthemix.

    Source: Junkee

    Sign in to follow this  


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now


  • We source our news and reviews from a number of sources.  From our local volunteer contributors (writers and reviewers) around Australia, to syndicated news sources including Your EDM, Dancing Astronaut, MixMag, By The Wavs, MNML, No Dough Music, Techno Kittens, Drum and Bass News, BBC, Junkee, and Trance Family.  Where the article has been sourced via syndication, you will find a link at the bottom of the article to the original source.

    Our local volunteer contributors are creative people who are passionate about the dance music and club scene in Australia and want to share their passion with others.  If you feel you fit into this category, we would love to hear from you!  Send us an application to become a contributor (writer / reviewer) by visiting https://ozclubbers.com.au/application

Add Your Event for FREE


  • Similar Content

    • InTheMix
      By InTheMix
      A slew of dance legends have opened up about the immense mental and physical toll of professional DJing in an eye-opening new documentary, Why We DJ — Slaves To The Rhythm. 
      The DJ Sounds produced doco was premiered recently at Amsterdam Dance Event, and features in-depth and candid discussions about mental health and addiction with acts such as Erick Morillo, Carl Cox, Luciano, Seth Troxler, Ben Pearce, and Pete Tong.
      The 40-minute film points to factors including creative pressure, constant media attention, omnipresent drugs and alcohol, and extreme sleep deprivation caused by a relentless touring schedules as to some of the reasons DJs experience such poor mental health.
      Read More We Regret To Inform You That The ABC Has Just Discovered Nangs   “It’s a crazy life…I think there’s an expiration date on your own sanity and trying to keep human with being a DJ,” Troxler says at one point. “It’s an odd profession where you’re [on stage] in front of hundreds of thousands of people, and then someone puts you in a room and you’re just…alone. That’s when it gets a bit sad. That’s why I think many DJs have problems with drugs, or even sex addiction — it’s just to cure the loneliness.”
      “We’ve lost a lot of people to drugs,” Troxler adds. “A lot of really talented people. They just kind of…floated to the wayside.”
      “I was drinking every day and chucking my life down the drain,” Ben Pearce confesses later in the film. “It got to a point that I knew that if I didn’t do something about it, I wouldn’t be around much longer.”
      Despite the obvious issues DJs face, Pete Tong says artists struggle to get support and sympathy: “Everyone’s got that image in their head of private jets and champagne…but the touring life of a DJ is really hard.”
      Why We DJ — Slaves To The Rhythm is now online, watch it below.

      The post Watch DJs Open Up About Drug Addiction And Mental Health In This New Doco appeared first on inthemix.
      Source: Junkee
    • InTheMix
      By InTheMix
      New data released today suggests NSW taxpayers are forking out hundreds of thousands of dollars for sniffer dogs at music festivals, despite little evidence they are effective.
      According to information compiled by the NSW Greens and reported by The Guardian, the cost of just three drug detection dogs at a music festival is a steep $6,006 per hour — or $36,036 for six hours. When extrapolated to 20 events a year, that figure turns into $720,720.
      Figures provided to Greens Justice spokesman David Shoebridge state that 9,380 people were searched as part of drug detection operations in the last year — but of those, only 1.7 percent were charged with drug dealing offences. Further information given to the NSW parliament shows that police spend nearly $9.5 million a year to maintain a drug detection squad.
      Read More Pill testing will no longer take place at festival Spilt Milk   For most music events, police decide whether they require drug detection squads and additional officers on the ground — and this cost is built into the overall ticket price.
      “Every time you see a dog at a festival that’s $2,000 per hour…for a dog who will 60 to 80 percent of the time sniff out someone who is not carrying any drugs,” Shoebridge told The Guardian. “$36,000 per festival to encourage people to take all their drugs at once, in advance, use drugs thought to be less detectable or just buy drugs inside the venue.”
      But NSW Police Minister Troy Grant — who has long been a fierce opponent to harm reduction services such as pill testing — rejected the claims made by the Greens, saying the dogs have a “strong deterrence factor” and he “makes no apology for using drug detection dogs to send a message to the community that we do not condone illicit drug use or trafficking”.
      This data comes less than a week after Canberra’s Spilt Milk festival abandoned plans to host a pill testing service at their event in November, citing a dispute over incomplete documentation.
      The post Here’s How Much Sniffer Dogs Cost Taxpayers Each Year appeared first on inthemix.
      Source: Junkee
    • Dancing Astronaut
      By Dancing Astronaut
      Some two years ago, the Los Angeles-based duo of Ben Bruce and Dylan Gold — who dubbed themselves um.. — began turning industry heads with their pay attention EP. Since then, um.. have amassed a significant cult following for music productions that were ominous, complex, and bizarre; at times, humorous, but above all, amorphous in form.
      During a recent Reddit AMA, these prodigies of peculiarity said a split was inevitable, although it was unclear when that time was coming. That is, until October 19, when the duo hinted at the impending split in a video blasted across their socials. The reasoning behind the break-up have been left purposefully vague.

      Deemed a “fundamentally dadaist act” by DA, um.. have now released their final track. As the um.. fanbase mourns this loss, listeners can enjoy one last bass heavy track with their signature off-kilter sound design, low-fi synths, and melancholy glitches.

      Read More: 
      um.. – Their Are to Kinds of People (Original Mix)
      um.. kick off Shambhala’s artist series with a relentless 30-minute mix
      Um.. – Yeah Word Cool Tight [Free Download]
      Source: Dancing Astronaut
    • Dancing Astronaut
      By Dancing Astronaut

      ODESZA has released a behind the scenes video illustrating the decisive events and artistic process that led to video accompaniment to their collaborative single with Leon Bridges, “Across The Room.” The breezy piano ballad, sung by Bridges, was released on ODESZA’s newest album A Moment Apart. 
      According to the video, Bridges had been a “dream collab” for the ODESZA boys for quite some time. Conversely, Bridges admits he had not heard of the duo prior to their reaching out to him; though later in the video he satisfactorily reports they are “the coolest cats” he has worked with thus far in his career.
      Both ODESZA and Bridges emphasize the creative energy discernible between them in their first meeting, which incited the eight hour studio session resulting in “Across The Room.”
      Read More: 
      ODESZA release fervent new music video for their Leon Bridges collaboration, ‘Across the Room‘
      Illenium joins Odesza, Sofi Tukker and Kasbo for special Halloween show
      French duo Ofenbach adds eclectic flair to Nick Waterhouse & Leon Bridge & Katchi
       
      Source: Dancing Astronaut
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. Privacy Policy, and Guidelines