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    • InTheMix
      By InTheMix
      A slew of dance legends have opened up about the immense mental and physical toll of professional DJing in an eye-opening new documentary, Why We DJ — Slaves To The Rhythm. 
      The DJ Sounds produced doco was premiered recently at Amsterdam Dance Event, and features in-depth and candid discussions about mental health and addiction with acts such as Erick Morillo, Carl Cox, Luciano, Seth Troxler, Ben Pearce, and Pete Tong.
      The 40-minute film points to factors including creative pressure, constant media attention, omnipresent drugs and alcohol, and extreme sleep deprivation caused by a relentless touring schedules as to some of the reasons DJs experience such poor mental health.
      Read More We Regret To Inform You That The ABC Has Just Discovered Nangs   “It’s a crazy life…I think there’s an expiration date on your own sanity and trying to keep human with being a DJ,” Troxler says at one point. “It’s an odd profession where you’re [on stage] in front of hundreds of thousands of people, and then someone puts you in a room and you’re just…alone. That’s when it gets a bit sad. That’s why I think many DJs have problems with drugs, or even sex addiction — it’s just to cure the loneliness.”
      “We’ve lost a lot of people to drugs,” Troxler adds. “A lot of really talented people. They just kind of…floated to the wayside.”
      “I was drinking every day and chucking my life down the drain,” Ben Pearce confesses later in the film. “It got to a point that I knew that if I didn’t do something about it, I wouldn’t be around much longer.”
      Despite the obvious issues DJs face, Pete Tong says artists struggle to get support and sympathy: “Everyone’s got that image in their head of private jets and champagne…but the touring life of a DJ is really hard.”
      Why We DJ — Slaves To The Rhythm is now online, watch it below.

      The post Watch DJs Open Up About Drug Addiction And Mental Health In This New Doco appeared first on inthemix.
      Source: Junkee
    • Dancing Astronaut
      By Dancing Astronaut
      A new study spearheaded by Help Musicians UK has determined that musicians may be up to three times more likely to suffer from depression as compared to the general public.
      Help Musicians UK is a leading independent charity for musicians in the UK. The study has emerged as a part of the charity’s Music and Depression (MAD) campaign, an initiative dedicated to examining the prevalence of mental health issues in the music industry. The first phase of the study sought to survey musicians, focusing on their working conditions in relation to their overall mental wellbeing via an industry-wide survey that recorded responses from a total of 2,211 artists. The number of voluntary participants in the online survey led the effort to become the largest of its kind in the UK to date.
      Graphic Credit: Music Minds Matter
      The majority of survey respondents were between the ages of 18-35, working across a variety of genres. Pop, rock, and alternative surfaced as the most prominent genres of music practiced by respondents. Of the various professions represented, including musicians, DJs, live crew, and music management, males and females were split relatively evenly, with 55.2% of respondents identifying as male, and 43.9% identifying as female.
      Graphic Credit: Music Minds Matter
      The survey’s findings indicate that musicians appear to be suffering from anxiety and depression in significant numbers. 71.1% of respondents reported that they had suffered from panic attacks and/or high levels of anxiety, while 68.5% reported that they suffered from depression. The survey concluded that musicians specifically may be up to three times more likely to suffer from depression compared to the public. While 39.5% of respondents were from London, the survey received responses from artists across the UK, indicating that the issue is problematic on a national scale.
      Graphic Credit: Music Minds Matter
      Help Musician UK’s examination determined that while artists might classify music production as its own kind of catharsis, working within the music industry might render artists more likely to develop mental health issues due to poor working conditions, the physical impacts of a musical career, a lack of recognition for one’s work, and dilemmas related to one’s sexual identity — female artists are notably more likely to be subjected to sexist attitudes and sexual harassment in the industry than male artists. Working in the industry might also exacerbate existing mental health complications.
      53% of respondents reported that they did not “find it easy to get help” for mental health issues, whereas 47% alternatively found it easy to seek out the necessary mental health related assistance. The percentages signal that the majority of respondents were not able to locate adequate resources to alleviate mental health related hardships.
      Help Musicians UK hopes to launch a nationwide mental-health service for music industry figures in 2017 following the completion of the study’s next phase. The survey represents a groundbreaking stride in the direction of increased comprehension regarding the presence and prevalence of mental health related afflictions in the music industry. The survey offers new insight into the source of artists’ mental health complications, illuminating potential avenues for support while underscoring what new methods might yet be developed.
      Via: Music Minds Matter
      Read More:
      New study confirms that avid concert-goers are generally happier people
      AFEM works with Help Musicians UK to create mental health support line
      Bass nectar & Electric Forest partner with TWLOHA to premiere video for National Suicide Prevention week
      Source: Dancing Astronaut
    • YourEDM
      By YourEDM
      In the world of bass music, sets longer than two hours are basically unheard of (unless you play drum & bass, and then the cut off is around 6 hours, but even then, only if you’re Andy C). Still, in the world of marathon sets, no one can beat house and trance DJs. The nature of the music itself allows DJs to play around with singular tracks for a longer time, phasing in and out, teasing new tracks, bringing old tracks back in… there’s an art to it.
      In honor of ADE, and for the 836th episode of A State Of Trance, Armada boss Armin van Buuren is live streaming for 14 hours straight in what we have to assume at this point is a complete trance. (Heh, get it?)
      Other artists will also play during the stream, including Aly & Fila.
      Watch it all below!

       
      Photo via Rukes.com
      This article was first published on Your EDM.
      Source: Armin van Buuren Starts 14-Hour Live Stream From ADE
      Source: Your EDM
    • YourEDM
      By YourEDM
      Hungarian songstress and hitmaker Ameria has collaborated Russian producer HYPRESSION on this new tune called, “Not About You,” and we’re all about it.
      This track, out today via Trap City and Spinnin Records, is all about the slow build and intense release. The first 70 seconds or so of the track are all on the rise with Ameria’s vocals until it crashes down with a reticent fury. The slightly phased, sweeping synth notes cause you to sway your head to and fro, almost without you even realizing it.
      One thing about the track that I feel could be slightly improved upon is the lack of versatility – it’s largely the same looping sequence for the duration of the track. However, to others, that repetition and consistency could be almost hypnotic. It’s all in the eye of the beholder.
      Check out the new track from Ameria & HYPRESSION, “Not About You,” below, out now on Trap City & Spinnin Records.

      This article was first published on Your EDM.
      Source: Your EDM Premiere: Ameria & HYPRESSION – Not About You [Trap City x Spinnin Records]
      Source: Your EDM
    • InTheMix
      By InTheMix
      Last December, Flosstradamus fans got the news that Josh Young, one half of the hitmaking duo, was leaving the project.
      In a video posted to his Instagram, Young broke the news that he was leaving to focus full time on his new project YehMe2. “I came to this decision at the end of summer, but due to circumstances outside of my control I wasn’t able to make this announcement until after the Flosstradamus tour ended,” he told fans at the time.
      Now in a new interview with Run The Trap, Young has opened up a little more about his split from the duo he dedicated 10 years of his life to, and admitted that having “creative control” of his own career was a deciding factor.
      Read More How Flosstradamus built the biggest show in dance music   “It was extremely difficult,” Young said. “After putting so much time and energy into the project it was a tough choice to make, but I felt it was time to let go.
      “There are some factors I’m willing to discuss publicly and some that I’m not. Mainly in addition to wanting to spend more time with my family, I wanted to take creative control of my career, music and artistic vision.”
      “When it came to music we didn’t collaborate,” he added. “Songs were usually produced by one of us. Curt usually produced the originals, and I usually handled remixes and collabs. I don’t miss sharing [that] creative responsibility.”
      Young also confessed he’s found it difficult to outlive the “hypeman stigma” now that he’s left the duo.
      “In the last year I’ve dropped 2 mixtapes, 60+ tracks and remixes and yet I still get people saying ‘all you do is yell on the mic.’ But as frustrating as that is, it’s a slight annoyance in the big scheme of things. Overall I’m just stoked on the shit I’m making.”
      Listen to Young’s latest release as YehMe2 below:

      The post Josh Young Speaks On Why He Split From Flosstradamus appeared first on inthemix.
      Source: Junkee
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