Jump to content
×
  • Can you help us?

    If you have some serious passion for your local scene, and are interested in helping us build Australia's newest electronic music community, hit on the Apply Now button below to become an Ozclubbers contributor!

    Apply Now

     

  • Sign in to follow this  

    Dastardly Kuts gets deep with DefWill.


    Dastardlyd
    • Category: News, Interview

    At first glance, Brisbane DJ DefWill appears to be going from strength to strength, balancing university studies, events management roles for festivals like Splendour in the Grass, Rabbits Eat Lettuce and Live Large, DJing some of the deepest techno rhythms at some of the primest techno parties on the east coast of Oz and also that he has never let the fact that he is deaf hold him back. Though if one takes the time to look (and talk) a little deeper it becomes clear that he, like many of us, carries burdens that are well beyond his control and the weight of which has been known to bring even the strongest of us down.

     

     

    New OzClubbers writer Dastardly Kuts gets deep with DefWill.

     

    DeafWill in the mix.jpg

     

    Dastardly Kuts: Now you truly are a well-known person in the Brisbane Electronic music scene, whether as a DJ, events manager or punter but what a lot of our readers may not know is that you are the only industry DJ in Australia that also has the word “deaf” in their bio. Can you give us your thoughts on how it is possible for someone who can’t hear to be a successful DJ?

    DefWill: First of the key elements of being a successful artist (Generally) is how you market yourself and where you fit yourself in the competition positioning map to other business models or genres, which is the same deal for winemakers or coffee beans. That’s why Starbucks failed! However, in relation to DJing, it’s all about how you position yourself to educate the audience, from the music you play thru to the experiences you provide and for me personally, is about telling a narrative to express my internal love of music and share that with others by taking them on an emotional journey.

    From a disabilities perspective…. It is a lot harder than people think, behind closed doors and having all the mental and physiological challenges of peer pressure, as well as the internal and external negative gearing within the communication barriers, it can sometimes be very difficult. These kinds of issues were established as a growing concern recently at the Ibiza Music Summit 2018 and it was a topic that was spoken about at length.
     

    DK: I’m sure most of our readers would agree that issues of mental health being discussed at places like IMS 2018 by high profile artists such as Pete Tong and a plethora of others in the dance music scene is a positive thing. From your unique perspective, how do you think it relates to people with disabilities?

    DW: In many ways to be honest and it’s a growing concern among families and friends, however, this epidemic is affecting everyone, from both the mainstream and disabilities demographic. I actually just handed in a case study to Jane Slingo (EMC Organiser) addressing how people with disabilities are more susceptible and infused with mental health challenges, and that there is growing evidence to suggest that people may actually suffer from the mental battle scares (Genetically) of our ancestry, passed down thru generations. So, if one of your descendants was a victim of violence, or worse still executed, any time from B.C. to 1800 A.D. then you could very well be more prone to mental illness, potentially thousands of years later.

    Take me for example, I grew up with a mother who also had a high degree of disabilities that she suffered because of the physical damage of brain injuries and which resulted in her being harshly bullied, not only by the people around her but also by her family. I believe that this damage control was infused in me and I, therefore, had to deal with these genetic challenges that were further exacerbated by rejection throughout my life and the fact that I was removed from my family by the “old fashion” government – DOC’s, during the early period of my life.  Though in 2018, society is much more aware of the challenges faced by people with disabilities and mental health problems, it was not that long ago when decisions regarding parents who had disabilities or who had worked in combat being unfit to raise children could likely be considered reasonable grounds for tearing families apart, which in truth may have unknown consequences for generations to come.

     

    DK: You have taken on a lot of important management roles within a number of high profile festivals over the last couple of years, in your opinion what are the current challenges faced in the management of disabilities, for artists, venues, and customers that want to enhance the nightlife or festival scene in their community?

    DW: I’m just glad that disabilities festivals are becoming more of a demographic hub these days because they are a great way to help educate people from many different cultures and demographics. Festivals such as AccessFest in Melbourne (run by the Dylan Alcott Foundation) and the Live Large Festival here in Brisbane (organized by CPL and the Treasury Casino) really helped open up my eyes to the large scale of the live and electronic music loving community here in Australia.

    With these festivals showcasing accessibility in all areas and that cater for all physical requirements by using business management techniques that reflect an inclusiveness for EVERYBODY, it’s not that hard to imagine translating this to smaller venues and clubs. With small adjustments, these businesses could cater to the growing population of people with disabilities, not only into the future but right now, today.

    There have been major callouts in the London electronic scene of late, with the need for re-education of all stakeholders and staff (security, venue management, promoters, artist management and so on) that deals with customer service roles within events management. This highlights that though things are improving, there is still a lot of work to be done and I’m not saying completely overhaul things, just re-adjustments on how we manage things like risk assessment and management as well as communication, because people with challenges don’t want to be seen as third-class citizens or victims of everyone’s problems. Like everyone else they just want to have a good time. 

     

    DK: Having supported some stellar talent from the electronic music scene such as Bass Kleph, Steve Ward, Jamie Stevens, Dylan Griffith, Makumba/Darkshire, and Hefty, you have obviously been a part of some epic shows both as a DJ and behind the scenes with your event brand La Vibrations, what has been some of the highlights for you?

    DW: My experience in events management has brought me a deep level of satisfaction as I know I have helped to change perceptions on how people with challenges are viewed in taking on these higher roles. I have really enjoyed working as Artist manager with James Anderson (Dark Forest Festival), as well as playing my part at Rabbits Eat Lettuce (All-rounder/Stage Management) and Splendour in the Grass (All Rounder) not only due to them being top quality festivals, but also because I was given the chance to see my influence on the events crew and how it made people work more professionally and calmer, to find other ways to communicate and get the task done.

    As for the DJ side of my life, I just recently warmed up for RAXON at Le Froth and I’m still helping out with Dragonfruit (Capulet) and Bass Swag Entertainment, but my highlight has to be…………… too many, they all have their own unique emotional vibes and engagement.

    However, with the love of being authentic and seeing the techno scene getting supported by IWTFA, Lemon & Lime, Le Froth, Bass Swag Ent, SHADES and Flux here in Brissy, whilst Melbourne (The city that never sleeps or known as city of benders of the ARTS) and Sydney both hosting a strong and diverse mix of genres, my biggest highlight would be that it appears the Australian techno scene is growing into a peaceful musical hub akin to that of the European scene.

     

    DK: As well as DJing and event production you are also currently studying at the Queensland University of Technology and majoring in Entertainment Industries, what are your thoughts on university life and the challenges people with disabilities may face to achieve success in both the entertainment and university fields?

    DW: I THINK IT F****N GREAT! Seriously, it is due to a number of reasons like Steph Dower, who did a master’s degree in Script Writing at QUT and countless others that are doing what they love to achieve their dreams. In this way, universities are putting more weight behind the less abled individuals and are supporting in the rise of role models for people with disabilities, which is sure to have a big import on future generations. 

    I would also like to mention that this been an interesting year for the whole disabilities world, which I see as a strong turning point on how people see us as human beings and not just third-class objects from the history of scars and conflict within (like the cold war inflicted on people’s psyche). Due to more artist and high-profile people speaking about the unbreakable silence and the conflict within ourselves, it is clear that we as a society need to stop and educate people, to make it clear that everyone suffering thru these kinds of challenges just want to lead a normal life as well, and to learn. Even though it may take us a long time to acknowledge the task of requirements and how we are going to grow our creative ideas, the results are often times worth the wait. 

     

    DK: In relation to the last question, do you have any personal experiences you’d like to share?

    DW: Well there is one experience that I hope others can get inspiration from and it is that even with my primary education being at Special School and that after attending two high schools, I dropped out in year 11 (mainstream after 14 schools) but I still went on to do studies at TAFE and am now in the end stages of completing a university degree. A degree that has seen me having an influence on the whole entertainment department of QUT and given me the knowledge to achieve success in this industry. If I can do it, you can do it too! If you believe in yourself and are willing to take a few risks.
     

    DK: How do you manage to juggle university life with that of a career in the entertainment industry, especially considering your disability?

    DW: Basically, just living on the edge of a sword but keeping motivations going with a flexibility of time management.

     

    DK: In the knowledge that nearly everyone that reads this interview will likely have the ability to listen to music, how would you best describe your approach and method of DJing to people that have no idea what it is like to be deaf?

    DW: Everyone refers to me as the guy in the movie “Its All Gone Pete Tong” or compare me to Robbie Wild (Scratch DJ/USA). In all honesty, you can take it either way.

    1/ Fill your ear with wool and try to DJ with them in your ear,

    or

    2/ use the coin perspective, where everyone is on heads because they can hear and for people like me, we are on tails because we are more in depths of vibrations from all parts of the body where the information channels.

     

    DK: I have heard that you would like to see “It’s All Gone Pete Tong” remade, what’s that all about?

    DW: Yes, that is true, I have actually been talking to a lot of people about doing it here in Australia but there is still no movement at the moment. I got hold of Pete Tong and the director to put in the pitch proposal, however even though the movie has most of the elements and challenges we face, I think that it’s a bit of a laugh overall as it is still fictional and I’m of the opinion that it’s time for a realistic version to be made.

     

    DK: With science and technology so rapidly improving, do you think that the majority of people with disabilities who choose a life in the entertainment sector will be helped or hindered by the meteoric rise of tech?

    DW: It can be a huge help, but it is dependent on how we all socialize and communicate on the topic, due to some high-profile people with disabilities being addicted to greed, wanting more things for free and being catered to by the mainstream who find them complex. I believe things are getting better but that it’s only a matter of time before we see how the cards play out towards the river card, that hopefully shifts things from a political to economic perspective.

     

    DK: To finish things off, tell us what’s in store for Defwill fans over the next few months?

    DW: Well I have two gigs in Melbourne on the 3rd and 4th of August, playing at Renegade (Top Floor) at My Aeon on Friday and Eat The Beat on Saturday at New Guernica, which sees me on closing duties both nights and means I will be bringing out the raw material for what will be an emotional journey. This will be my fourth time playing in Melbourne and I have loved every moment down there.

    I’ve also got a special event coming up with an interstate headliner that recently did a collaboration track with Citizen Kain and that a lot of people who caught the set at Elements music festival last year will definitely remember. Then early next year we are taking things to another level, showcasing equality and diversity for large and long going project planning but at the moment things are still a little “hush-hush” so stay tuned!

     

    https://www.facebook.com/Defwill01/

    https://www.mixcloud.com/willdefwilkroger

     

     

    • Like 1
    Sign in to follow this  



  • Comments

  • We source our news and reviews from a number of sources.  From our local volunteer contributors (writers and reviewers) around Australia, to syndicated news sources including Your EDM, Dancing Astronaut, MixMag, By The Wavs, MNML, No Dough Music, Techno Kittens, Drum and Bass News, BBC, Junkee, and Trance Family.  Where the article has been sourced via syndication, you will find a link at the bottom of the article to the original source.

    Our local volunteer contributors are creative people who are passionate about the dance music and club scene in Australia and want to share their passion with others.  If you feel you fit into this category, we would love to hear from you!  Send us an application to become a contributor (writer / reviewer) by visiting https://ozclubbers.com.au/application

Add Your Event for FREE
Invite A Friend


  • Similar Content

    • Nordic-By-Nature
      By Nordic-By-Nature
      Hey Marcus. Thanks for chatting with OzClubbers. Thank you in advance for taking the time to answer some questions for us.
      Most welcome, thank you guys for reaching out!
       
      You’ve been referred to as one of the fastest rising stars in Australia’s dance music scene. What’s it like hearing things like this?
      It is beyond surreal to hear things like that because you just never expect it. For me, I’ve always just done my thing and worked on my music because it’s my passion, I never thought it’d turn into something that people from all around the world are appreciating and listening to and it is definitely inspiring hearing people say nothing but great things! It certainly keeps me grounded and keeps me motivated and hungry for more.
       
      How would you describe your sound to someone that hadn’t heard your music?
      My sound is quite simply full of melodies. What drives me to produce the music I make is having a sense of feeling and connection rather than just a bunch of random sounds being glued together. It’s progressive, groovy, euphoric, uplifting and full of good vibes. Genre-wise, you can find it along of the lines of Progressive House, Big Room and Trance.
       
      Tell us about how you got into electronic music. Do you remember your first couple of gigs in the early days? 
      Music was always a big part of my upbringing as a kid, more specifically, dance music. My father was a DJ back in the late 70s and early 80s so disco-funk was always played at home. As time went by, I discovered artists like Daft Punk and around 2003-2004 I discovered artists such as Tiesto, Armin van Buuren, Axwell, Above & Beyond, Dirty South and I guess you could say the rest is history!
       
      I still remember my first gig like it was yesterday. It was on April 13, 2011 at the Sydney Olympic Park for an under 18 music festival called ‘ID’. It was a surreal feeling flying to Sydney to play a gig (for free by the way) for the first time since I am from Melbourne, but it’s still a memory I hold most close to me throughout my musical career. 
       
      What are your thoughts on the Melbourne electronic scene at the moment? Melbourne sees all the large scale events but is it keeping it underground too? What about Sydney?
      I think right now, the electronic music scene in Melbourne has gone back underground and I personally think that’s where it works best. Obviously for artists who play a bit more ‘main-room’ such as myself, it does get a bit hard to showcase but that’s where the larger shows come into play and I’m absolutely grateful for that! Sydney is where I feel most comfortable on a music front. I think going back to the previous question about my first show, I do feel I have a strong connection with the Sydney scene and the fans there but yes, there is a vast comparison with Melbourne & Sydney in terms of the scene.
       
      What are your thoughts on the revival of trance that seems to be happening now?
      I think it’s great! Trance was one of the first styles of electronic music that I heard and was apart of, I guess you could say it was my “inception into dance music”. I really love what I am hearing out there from artists not only around the world, but in Australia too. It’s creating a lot more opportunities now for the next generation of artists who are keeping it alive.
       
      We’re chatting to you from Brisbane and while we don’t see as many of the bigger events like Melbourne and Sydney do, we still get quality artists coming here but just in smaller more intimate venues. We have a strong trance following here. Do you have any thoughts on keeping the scene going and growing it for smaller cities such a Brisbane?
      I certainly miss playing in Brisbane, it’s always going to be one of my favourite cities in Australia! I haven’t been in a while, but from what I’ve seen it’s definitely growing. You have the team over at Eden really making a difference bringing in some of the hottest acts right now and I think that’s incredibly healthy for the scene to grow and become a super strong community. 
       
      What was it like being invited as a guest mixer on Above & Beyond’s ‘Group Therapy’ radio show including doing the ‘Push The Button’ feature??
      Unbelievable! I remember receiving the email at around 4am saying how urgently it needed to be done so I quickly got up in the early hours of the morning and got straight to work. Above & Beyond were the first artists in the Trance scene to pick up my new direction and having their support has been nothing short of amazing, especially since I never thought they’d be such big supporters along the way. And to all the fans who listen to ABGT and voted for me on Push The Button…that’s another surreal feeling knowing my music has connected with them on some level.
       
      Who’s your favourite artist or producer right now?
      This year has certainly been full of nothing but amazing music, so it is definitely hard to pick a favourite but I’d say right now ARTY has been doing the rounds for me. I love melodic music as I mentioned and he always delivers, especially with his alias ALPHA 9 which always works well in my DJ sets. Coming out of Australia though I’d say WILL K, he’s currently living in the UK but he’s working on some incredible music and making tremendous waves and as one of my best friends I could not be more proud than to see that happening.
       
      Finally, what do you listen to in your downtime?
      I think as a producer, you don’t want to over-do your ears with the same vibes 24/7 so in my ‘downtime’ I like to listen to more Indie/Folk vibes. Artists such as London Grammar, Coldplay, Jon Hopkins for example and recently I discovered an artist under the name of SHAED. 
       
       
      More Marcus Santoro
      Soundcloud:
       
      Twitter:
      https://twitter.com/marcussantorodj?lang=en
       
      Facebook:
      https://www.facebook.com/MarcusSantoroDJ/
       
      Instagram:
      https://www.instagram.com/marcussantorodj/?hl=en
       
       
    • AdamMadd
      By AdamMadd
      Hi Kivah, thanks for taking the time to chat!  Where are you right now and what you been up to this month?
      After travelling for the last couple of months non stop, taking the plane literally ten times in one month, I finally am settled back in London and this month I am completely focused on my single release and preparing new songs.
       
      Can you tell us a bit, in your opinion, about the scene where you are located? It is conducive to the artistic/creative lifestyle?
      I think London is one of the best places in the world to be especially for the music and artistic/creative lifestyle. London is so diverse  - you can be in Shoreditch or Camden Town, which are so alternative, and then take a cab to Mayfair and in half an hour you are in a posh private members clubs with quite a mainstream  scene. I just love the diversity of London!
       
      How does it compare to Mallorca?
      Well there are definitely more opportunities in a big city rather than on a small island. Lots of chances to make great contacts, attend events nonstop, network with industry and non- industry people and most importantly the major  artists will be surely playing in London whereas there is no chance to see your favourite artists playing in Mallorca.
       

      What inspired you to get into music?
      I always loved singing. I can’t even remember when  it started. Funny enough my dad reminded me a couple of years ago that when I was like 7 years old I already put my hand in a fist pretending that it was  a mike and was singing and dancing like crazy. I didn’t remember that I just though it all started when I formed my band when I was 15 but seems like it comes from much earlier.
       
      You got in early, being the lead singer and co-founder of “The New Flesh” in your teens, can you tell us a bit about how that came about?
      My first boyfriend was a musician, he played the bass in another band. Then the band disbanded and he suggested that I was the  lead singer, so we formed The New Flesh (we were a bit gothic back then) and that’s how I became singer-songwriter.
       
      We heard you have even recorded tracks for Café Del Mar.  Is this true, and if so, can you tell us more?
      Yes I have been doing some chill out music in the past. I have co-written a song called “Nobody” with the DJ/Producer Luis Junior and recorded “Now We Are Free” the original soundtrack of the movie Gladiator in chill out version. These tracks have been featured in albums like Space Café, Cinema Lounge, Dome Ibiza as well as Luis Juniors album “Neibum” both distributed by Café del Mar.
       
       
      Do you remember what it felt to sing for the first time in front of a crowd? How did you feel, and how well did it go?
      I was excited and nervous at the same time but with the experience and professionalism of my fellow musicians I felt sheltered and everything went great and I ended up having a lot of fun!
       
      You’ve just released a massive tune with MOTi.  How did that come about?
      MOTi  heard my song and loved it! He said he wanted to do the remix! We thought this was a collaboration we couldn’t turn down and let him add his magic to the track and the rest was history as they say!
       
      I’m sure working with MOTi is probably up there, but what would be your biggest achievement in your music career so far?
      My biggest achievement  at the moment is with “All You Sexy Ladies” I think it’s the best record so far as well as setting up my own record label. I am a businesswoman and have set up various businesses in the past so when the opportunity arrived I thought let’s go for it!
       
      What do you personally consider to be the perceptive moments of your artistic career?
      When I decided to be brave and moved firstly to Madrid to continue my musical career on my own as all the other band members were too comfortable in Mallorca but I was always quite ambitious and wanted to achieve more. A whole new experience started there for me in a big city and then later on I have repeated the same change by moving to London chasing the same dream.
       
      You’ve done a lot of modelling and acting in your time, starting from a very young age.  Can you tell us any particular memorable moments in your modelling and acting career that will stick with you for the rest of your life?
      I have many memorable moments especially when shooting commercials but I think one of the proudest  is an eight page reportage in a very popular magazine in Spain called MAN not only because it was a great achievement but also because I have shot this with a dear photographer friend of mine who has passed away suddenly couple of years ago in his hotel room in Mexico. He was such a great photographer and that photo shoot session will be in my heart and memory forever.
       
      What do you listen to in your downtime?
      My taste in music is very eclectic but the last couple of years I have been listening a lot to The Weeknd, his voice just draws me in.
       
      And lastly, what words of wisdom would you pass on to those who are just starting out in the music industry?
      Always believe in yourself, don’t be put off what some people in the industry  tell you, you’re too fat, you’re too thin, you’re too young, you’re too old, your voice is not good enough and so on. When you are passionate about what you do with work, determination and focus you can achieve anything in life!
       
      Listen to Kivah's track here:
       
      MOTi:
       
       
      MOTi
      https://www.instagram.com/motiofficial
      https://m.facebook.com/motiofficial/
       
      Kivah
      https://www.facebook.com/kivah/
      https://www.instagram.com/kivahofficial/?hl=en
      https://twitter.com/kivahofficial?lang=en
       
       
    • AdamMadd
      By AdamMadd
      When Armin van Buuren hit the Psy-Trance scene with the blistering ‘Great Spirit’ (with Vini Vici), many felt it would only be a matter of time before the five-time #1 DJ in the world would subject the global dance music movement to a record of similar magnitude and style. That moment has officially arrived today. Released on Armada Music, ‘Blah Blah Blah’ proves a telling precursor of what’s to come from Armin van Buuren’s forthcoming ‘Blah Blah Blah EP’, which is available for pre-order now and includes ‘The Last Dancer’, ‘Just As You Are’ (as Rising Star) and ‘Popcorn’.
       
      Listen here
       
      From the foreboding intro with the iconic lyrics to the devastating kick-bass combo, ‘Blah Blah Blah’ has been staking its claim as a main stage staple since its premiere at Ultra Music Festival 2018 in Miami. A buster of speakers and inducer of carnage, this track has fans going wild from Miami to Amsterdam to Sydney and back.
       
      When asked about the inspiration for his second, devastatingly powerful Psy-Trance tune, Armin van Buuren said: “Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah ‘Blah Blah Blah’ Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah. Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah ‘Blah Blah Blah’ Blah Blah Blah Blah.”
       
       

    • Nordic-By-Nature
      By Nordic-By-Nature
      An
      YET AGAIN, Brisbane is being spoilt for choice as another great artist is set to return to the garden Capulet this weekend. OzClubbers was lucky enough to have a very candid chat with Jody ahead of this weekend's show brought to you by Lemon & Lime.
      As always with OzClubbers we like to keep it local and ask questions that the fans themselves want to know.  This Q&A was developed in collaboration with our very own Anjuna Brisbane crew!  Big ups to A.B.C Crew Admin Jason Whyte and crew member Riley Keatch.
       
        Artist Name: Jody Wisternoff
      Label: Anjunadeep
      What’ve you got planned for us here in Brisbane on September 16?
       
      Gonna be road testing a lot of new material from Anjunadeep10 which is nearing completion, a few new JW remixes, some classic WOW and just a bunch of hot shit basically! It’s gonna be a day to remember!
      You’ve been to Brisbane a few times – what do you like about?
       
      The parties are always daytime which I’m a huge fan of. This is a concept we’ve really embraced with the Anjunadeep open air events this summer! Capulet is such a fun spot to play, super intimate and a lovely friendly crowd. I usually end up getting kidnapped and going out afterwards too.
      How do you prepare for a set when you’re travelling?
       
      By listening to new music with my ears lol. But seriously, decent noise cancelling headphones are essential (BOSE) and a lot of planning in Rekordbox and Ableton. I generally like to map out my sets beforehand, although things usually change in the heat of the moment…
      Any thoughts on the progressive scene at the moment?
       
      In its broadest sense ie. including deep house/melodic techno/desert music etc, I think the scene is super healthy at the moment, worldwide!  Our Anjunadeep parties are starting to get booked at some of the best venues in the world. Printworks in London coming up for example. The show we did at Mirage in Brooklyn in the summer sold more tickets than a lot of the super trendy hipster parties around at that time.  Asia seems to be an expanding market for our sound right now too. So all in all I feel things are rocking at the moment!
      How is the progressive scene different to other crowds? Eg a techno or EDM crowd.
       
      I don’t really go to many techno parties and I know the EDM crowd is mostly very young. What I can say about the crowds we seem to pull is that people are generally extremely friendly and really care about the music. We get quite a few young ones (recent converts from trance) a few old ravers and everything in between - plus a good female to male ratio!
       
      Our scene here is relatively small - as a DJ do you have any thoughts on keeping the scene alive?
       
      Of course, because the scene is my livelihood pretty much. I can only do my bit really, a small cog in a big wheel.
      You got into music at the early age. What’s around these days that parents could show their kids to get them interested in making electronic music?
       
      I would suggest FL Studio (fruity loops) or garage band as an entry point. However, I did recently install FL Studio on my daughter’s laptop as an attempt to train her up as my young padwan but she only seems interested in playing Simms lol.
      Any work started on Anjunadeep 10?
       
      It’s nearing completion and I’ll be road testing some of it at the Brisbane show.
      Who’s your favourite producer?
       
      Volen Sentir.
      What do you listen to in your downtime?
       
      A lot of oldskool hiphop (1986 - 1990) and Rave (1990 – 1991) eg. before the BPM’s went crazy and it all got corny. Not much country music, although I do love the soundtrack to Crazy Heart!
       
      For more information
      https://www.facebook.com/jodywisternoff
       
      Check out his latest promo mix here:
      https://soundcloud.com/jodywisternoff/jody-wisternoff-august-2018-soundcloud-dj-mix
       
      Tickets are on final release so if haven't got a ticket for the show this Sunday 16th September get in quick!
       
      https://www.facebook.com/events/1082244951931342/

    • Nordic-By-Nature
      By Nordic-By-Nature
      Symbiotic is excited to announce that Australian & International favourite MaRLo as well as fellow Aussie Marcus Santoro, will be joining Showtek at their Melbourne show this November.

      MaRLo:

      Leaving a mark on charts, dance floors and music enthusiasts the world over, Dutch born / Aussie MaRLo backs up the #1 Best Trance DJ and #2 overall DJ in Australia with no justification required.  From Beatport #1’s, escaping the studio, to headlining some of the most sought after dance events in the world, MaRLo is influencing trance, tech trance and progressive house music like no other.  With a solid European beginning, now Australian residing MaRLo took inspiration from pioneers Mauro Picotto, Aphex Twin, Ferry Corsten and The Prodigy where the studio came before the shows and a live act was how he ignited.  Driving an incredible talent in the studio, he has risen to striking heights claiming top chart spots.  Signed to Armin van Buuren’s ‘Armada Music A State of Trance Recordings’ proudly boast releases that have taken the world by storm, with Armin personally noting that MaRLo knows how to program the best lead sounds.

      Marcus Santoro:

      Having already picked up more than a dozen plays and invited as a guest mixer on Above & Beyond’s ‘Group Therapy’ radio show including the coveted ‘Push The Button’ feature, Melbourne’s Marcus Santoro proves why he is becoming known as one of the fastest rising artists in today’s Australian dance music scene.  Full of delicate, building chords, soothing atmospherics and an undeniable groove, he has truly laid the down the law on musical enthusiasts and their playlists globally.

      Unstoppable, the Santoro profile has been tapped by Swedish House Mafia maestro's Axwell /\ Ingrosso with releases on: Axtone, Armada, Revealed, Sony Music, Enhanced and most recently, gaining the attention of Armin van Buuren on his highly respected ‘A State Of Trance’ radio show, where his studio aptitude is imprinting itself on airwaves globally.

      Showtek:

      Dutch duo, Showtek, in conjunction with Symbiotic, have announced an exclusive Australian show for one night only, in which they will be showcasing a musical spectrum from their early years until today.

       Flirting with the Hardstyle sound with performances at Defqon.1 and Knockout Circuz, fans will be treated with two special sets from Showtek exhibiting their current sound, as well their hardstyle sound, with classic hits such as ‘FTS’ and ‘Expansion.’

      "We are so excited for this show.  We love our Australian Fans, who have been supporting us from the beginning.  So, to all the Showtek fans around Australia, come check us out and experience a night for the books.  We will be playing the full spectrum of the Showtek sound, from FTS to BOOYAH, to our newest upcoming singles.  We can’t wait" - SHOWTEK

      With more than 15 years under their belts, Showtek continue to develop their musical evolution and transform their diverse styles.  With crowd favourites such as: ‘Cannonball’ and ‘Booyah’ creating international attention and ‘Bad’ having dominated international charts and going platinum in Australia, it resulted in countless new fans across the globe.

      Today, Showtek is recognized as undisputed leaders within the electronic dance music genre.  This night will complement the entire spectrum of the Showtek sound. 


       
      Showtek – Past to Present – Australia

       Friday 2nd November – Festival Hall, Melbourne

      Featuring Australian / International talent: MaRLo & Marcus Santoro


       

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. Privacy Policy, and Guidelines