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    KSHMR Earns No. 12 On DJ Mag Top 100 DJs List As Highest Audio-Visual Act


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    KSHMR‘s live act is unlike anything else — which is exactly why the producer has found himself at No. 12 on the DJ Mag Top 100 DJs list for 2017. That placement earns KSHMR the highest audio-visual act award on the chart!

    It’s been a big year for KSHMR, to say the least. Aside from playing some of the largest festivals in the world (i.e. Ultra, EDC Las Vegas, Tomorrowland), he launched his very own imprint Dharma Worldwide. The massive compositions heard with “Festival of Light” and his “Harder” collaboration with the legendary Tiesto are only the beginning of what’s to come.

    “Bringing the live orchestra into my show has been crazy, it really inspired and challenged me,” KSHMR says of his 2017. “Aside from that, lots of new music and trying to enter the world of film scoring.”

    He broke into the chart back in 2015, debuting at No. 23 and has never looked back.

    Check out our full breakdown of the DJ Mag Top 100 DJs 2017 here.

    KSHMR Live at Ultra Miami 2017

    Photo via Rukes.com

    This article was first published on Your EDM.
    Source: KSHMR Earns No. 12 On DJ Mag Top 100 DJs List As Highest Audio-Visual Act

    Source: Your EDM

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