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    Listen to Deadmau5’s insane two hour techno mix


    OzClubbers

    At the beginning of his second-to-last BBC Radio 1 show last weekend, Deadmau5 promised us just one thing: “Tonight’s all about as much good music as we can cram in.”

    And yep, he definitely delivered. The Canadian producer lay down two hours of wall-to-wall techno crushers, featuring tracks from Len Faki, Nic Fanciulli, Matador, Frost, and Dubfire. Noticeably absent were any ID’s from his techno alias Testpilot — but then again, he did gift us with a entire mix of that earlier this year. Listen to the mix below.

    The man himself will be in the country later this month to play Sensation and Creamfields festivals in Sydney and Melbourne, alongside acts like Oliver Heldens, Fedde Le Grand, and Showtek.

    There’s a good chance we’ll be hearing some new music from him when he’s here too, as he’s recently taken to dropping unreleased edits into his sets. He also recently let slip that after the Australian tour wraps up he’ll be knuckling down in his monster studio to record a new album, the followup to 2016’s W:/2016ALBUM/. 

    Tracklist

    C.O.Z. – ‘Distortion’
    Raumakustik – ‘Trigger Kick’
    Harvey McKay – ‘Cover Up’
    Green Velvet & Shiba San – ‘Fearless’
    Eitan Reiter – ‘Pyramid’ (Dusty Kid Adventure Mix)
    Dubfire – ‘Ribcage’ (Dense & Pika Remix)
    Julian Jeweil – ‘Space’
    Riva Starr & Hyperloop – ‘Resilience’
    Matador – ‘Juniper’
    Kaiserdisco – ‘Orcus’
    Mark Knight & Green Velvet & René Amesz – ‘Live Stream’
    Nic Fanciulli – ‘The First Step’
    Kostas Maskalides – ‘Furnace’
    Donatello – ‘Mandala’
    Budd – ‘Epique’
    Will Clarke & Huxley – ‘My Body’
    Victor Ruiz & Drunken Kong – ‘Inside Out’ (Reinier Zonneveld Remix)
    DJ Hell – ‘Anything, Anything’ (Solomun Remix)
    Len Faki – ‘My Black Sheep’ (Jimmy Edgar & Truncate Remix)
    Frost – ‘Afterglow’ (feat. Leo Kalyan)

    The post Listen to Deadmau5’s insane two hour techno mix appeared first on inthemix.

    Source: InTheMix

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  • We source our news and reviews from a number of sources.  From our local volunteer contributors (writers and reviewers) around Australia, to syndicated news sources including Your EDM, Dancing Astronaut, MixMag, By The Wavs, MNML, No Dough Music, Techno Kittens, Drum and Bass News, BBC, Junkee, and Trance Family.  Where the article has been sourced via syndication, you will find a link at the bottom of the article to the original source.

    Our local volunteer contributors are creative people who are passionate about the dance music and club scene in Australia and want to share their passion with others.  If you feel you fit into this category, we would love to hear from you!  Send us an application to become a contributor (writer / reviewer) by visiting https://ozclubbers.com.au/application

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