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  • PURE 2018 - BRISBANE VENUE CHANGE​​​​​​​


    Nordic-By-Nature

    The Tivoli, Hardware, Bush Records and Carl Cox announce today, a change of venue for PURE 2018.  

    For reasons relating to trading hours and liquor licensing, Family Nightclub will now play host to this event in Brisbane, taking place on the same scheduled date. 

    Patrons who have previously purchased tickets through Ticketmaster will be issued with a full refund. 

    Tickets for the Family show will go on sale through: Eventbrite this Thursday 15th March.

    __________________________________________  

    PRESS RELEASE

    One of Australia and New Zealand’s most loved techno event, returns for its third year, to announce another huge lineup. 

    PURE, presented and curated by: Carl Cox, Eric Powell of Bush Records and Richie McNeill of Hardware, will see

    Paco Osuna (Spain), Nastia (Ukraine) and Fabio Neural (Italy) take PURE to the next stage in 2018. 

    After its first year in Ibiza, winning best event of the summer in September 2017, this year the Australian leg expands to include: Brisbane for the first time alongside regulars Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Auckland.  PURE 2018 will tour Australia and New Zealand over the ANZAC Day weekend in April.

    Celebrating techno and house music, PURE has quickly established itself as a ‘must attend’ event for dance music fans across the two countries, thanks to its reputation as an event where the audience can make a special connection with the DJs.

    In April of 2016, Carl Cox launched the first installment of his PURE event in Australia.  Taking place in Melbourne and Sydney, the event showcased players from the global Techno and House movements. 

    Paco Osuna from Spain has enjoyed being a local hero in Ibiza for years.  He is one of, if not Spain’s most famous DJ from playing the legendary Florida 135 in Barcelona regularly, to playing heavily across Ibiza during the summer as well as the infamous Elrow parties. Nastia from the Ukraine needs no introduction with her blend of driving techno fused with Detroit tones.  The fastest rising DJ from this sector of the planet.  Fabio Neural from Italy is best known for his output on Carl’s Intec Digital label.  Playing Ibiza at Pure this year at Privilege, he’s shown us what he is capable of with his driving techno reminiscent of his peers Joseph Capriati and Marco Carola.

    Join us for a night of Pure techno, delivered with incredible sound in an old fashioned no nonsense, no fluff rave atmosphere.

    PURE 2018 Line-up:

    Carl Cox (Frankston)

    Paco Osuna (Spain)

    Nastia (Ukraine)

    Fabio Neural (Italy)

    Eric Powell (Australia)

    And more to be announced.

    TOUR DATES:

    Friday 20 April - Logan Campbell Centre, Auckland

    Saturday 21 April - Festival Hall, Melbourne

    Tuesday 24 April - Metro City, Perth (Anzac Day Eve)

    Friday 27 April - Family, Brisbane (New Venue update) – Tickets on-sale this Thursday 15thMarch via Eventbrite.com.au

    Saturday 28 April - Hordern Pavilion, Sydney

    For more info on Hardware, go to:

    https://www.facebook.com/hardwarepresents

    https://twitter.com/hardwarepres

    https://www.instagram.com/hardwarepresents

     

    Edited by Nordic-By-Nature




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    Our local volunteer contributors are creative people who are passionate about the dance music and club scene in Australia and want to share their passion with others.  If you feel you fit into this category, we would love to hear from you!  Send us an application to become a contributor (writer / reviewer) by visiting https://ozclubbers.com.au/application

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      I’ve also got a special event coming up with an interstate headliner that recently did a collaboration track with Citizen Kain and that a lot of people who caught the set at Elements music festival last year will definitely remember. Then early next year we are taking things to another level, showcasing equality and diversity for large and long going project planning but at the moment things are still a little “hush-hush” so stay tuned!
       
      https://www.facebook.com/Defwill01/
      https://www.mixcloud.com/willdefwilkroger
       
       
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