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  1. Firstly, thanks to onlytechno.net for the article which commenced the ideas flowing in my mind. The “3 Things DJs Shouldn’t Do On Stage” article struck a few chords which if anything – from the Crusty DJ corner (as I'm sure I'd be categorised), at least – had to elaborate on the valid points raised. For any old school DJs – like myself – the three points included (and surely there could be more) are certainly not invalid, yet a tad vague; if not unspecified. Let’s discuss. 1. Never Get Too Drunk Or High There are so many heroes in DJ culture who remain pretty sober “on stage”. If we only refer to Carl Cox’s comments in the recent mini-biopic “What We Started” when he mentions his four beers in a ten-hour set – as well as him being the biggest radiator of energy perhaps the DJ industry has seen while performing. Yet Carl is now 54 years of age and when he – like many of his modern, industry-establishing peers started what they started – it was widely a party scene. If you asked half – if not most – of Cox’s generational cohorts, now seen as legendary – having more than just a few shandies while headlining was more than the norm. But, as technology’s role in electronic music has rocketed ahead of social control, the community has also multiplied while said generation’s bodies have gotten older. As has expectation. Having said that, I did see one of the founders of modern day dance music pretty close to “off his cake” while playing on the rooftop at Melbourne’s Brown Alley, earlier this year. He did not disappoint either. Perhaps it’s the experience factor. Point being – some can still rock it if they know their tunes and controlling the crowd is second nature. Just don’t do it at a new place with an unknown crowd and no sound crew. But don’t rule out that old habits don’t die hard! 2. Talking On The Microphone “A noticeable trend among EDM sets….” And there we have it. EDM. Drum and Bass, along with Jungle and the UK Garage branches of the dance music tree all began with MCs. Understandably so, because the roots of these genres came from urban London, where Reggae, toasting and parts of Hip-Hop culture were linked. Raves of the late eighties and early nineties, back in the day even used the MC. However, evolution has dictated that nightclubs haven’t required them as such where House Music is concerned. The DJ has let the music do all the talking. With that in mind, perhaps we should let evolution’s path prevail and let glory be fed through the all of the music played. 3. Playing Bangers Only This was a lesson many DJs may have learned the hard way. Sasha, in his early days at the Hacienda was told off by his mentor DJ; Jon Da Silva – for doing exactly this. Unless you learn this lesson (years ago this would not have been documented in media) first-hand, you can retain what many try shedding from their backs – the “lack of depth” tag. The joy of clubbing at top notch, or simply unique clubs is – and always has been – hearing new music for the first time and feeling privileged for it. The thrill of not being part of the humdrum high street mass which settles for exactly they’ve heard a thousand times on Cheese FM already during the previous few days – is a rare feeling. Granted, DJs will agree that at some parties; old established favourites can be what may be needed. But nowadays, more than before with the choice of tracks available – the fine line between being a carbon copy of many other DJs or even events - can be averted by doing your homework. Acquiring different sounds or at least playing them a different way makes a huge variance in the listener’s experience. CONCLUSION There may be other elements to be included on the “avoidance” short list and I’m sure many DJ’s would concur. Yet two words which can define what is done and how - are the words “on stage.” Each stage is different, horses for courses. Particularly if you’re entrenched in the modern demands of broken travel, forcing to be happy after a possible rough journey – or basically playing a booking of which you know nothing, or very little. That goes from the young DJ driving him or herself to one of their first gigs – to the elite intercontinental DJs travelling across the world to a fresh, unproven festival. You could, of course – be in heaven moving from one place to the other and meeting new faces every day. If you played one or two gigs a weekend, which paid the bills; allowed you to party with the crowd, played whatever you liked and then slept comfortably (when required), life would be easy. Wouldn’t it?
  2. GALLEON: So guys, thanks so much for sitting down with me to talk about all things Musika! Tell us about how you began working with each other and the name Yolanda Be Cool? YBC: Sure no worries, our pleasure. Matty used to DJ at a bar I used to bartend at. I used to take him tequila shots and talk his ear off about music and djaying. Before long I was buying records and we started playing back to back at clubs all over Sydney then Australia. Then naturally we started making mix tapes and bootlegs together, then before long we ended up doing official remixes then finally releasing our own original singles. The name comes from one of our favourite scenes from one of our favourite movies.. Pulp Fiction… “Be Cool Honey Bunny” “Tell that bitch to be cool”.. YOLANDA BE COOL... GALLEON: On your new jam Musika, you feature the vocals of Kwanzaa Posse. Who are they and how did you get to colaborate with them. YBC: We are always on the hunt for killer tracks to sample. On one of our sample hunts we came across Kwanzaa Posse out of Africa and their tune Musika had an amazing vocal part that really stood out to us. So we got to work on a version and sent it to their publisher to approve. They loved it so much they were happy to be featured artists on the single. We were stoked. GALLEON: Looking to the hot remix package for Musika, you have chosen some wicked artists such as Babert, GotSome, Flash89 & Dateless to put their touch to the record. How did you choose these artists? YBC: We were so lucky with this remix package, it was a combination of the legends at Sweat It Out calling in a lot of favours and I think the track being unique and appealing to remix which allowed us to get such dope names on the package. GALLEON: You guys are heavily involved with the running of Sweat It Out. How did you become associated with one of the late Ajax's biggest ventures? YBC: We both idolised Ajax, and still think he is the best DJ ever. When Sydney didn’t have the lock out laws we used to finish work at 2:00am in the bar above then run down and watch Ajax and the Bang Gang play till 6:00am at their weekly party…. We did this for years and then Matt was woking at a record label helping Ajax put together his legendary mashed DJ mix compilations, they got chatting about starting their own label and after a few hot and sweaty laksa’s on hung over Mondays.. 'Sweat It Out’ was born. GALLEON: Your music has often featured vibes from Africa and Latin America, giving your records a great uplifting carnival feel. Are world music and other cultures a big influence for you? YBC: Most definitely and we don’t discriminate. We have sampled tunes from Africa, Columbia, Italy, England and Camaroon to name a few countries. We love combing elements and sounds from exotic places and re-contextualising them in a way that makes sense for us and the dance floors we play to. GALLEON: What are your biggest 3 records right now. YBC: ahhh Our friend did an edit of Raingurl by Yaeji which is so dope… Fisher’s tune STOP IT always kills it. and of course Musika feat Kwanzaa Posse by us:) GALLEON: Tell us about the biggest gig you have ever played and why? YBC: The biggest number of people was a free party for the King of Morocco. There was over 100,000 people there. But one of our personal favourite biggest gigs for us was the MTV party @ Amnesia in Ibiza with A-Trak and Armand Van Helden. That was sick
  3. Valentino Khan is a man that needs no introduction. He’s a producer that transcends genres and trends with a style that’s all his own. He’s the guy behind “Deep Down Low,” the most played track of 2015. He’s a person with a mustache so iconic, it deserves its own merch line. But most of all, he’s an artist dedicated to the music — and that’s why we jumped at the chance to interview him. With every move, the LA-based producer is making an impact on the industry, with a sound unmistakably original, ridiculously cool, and constantly evolving. Not to mention, Valentino’s latest track featuring the legendary Sean Paul is pure “Gold.” Valentino’s work instinctively find releases on leading imprints such as Mad Decent and OWSLA, and he’s worked with a plethora of artists including Diplo, Skrillex, GTA and Flosstradamus. Plus, remixing everyone from Katy Perry to Dog Blood, Axwell Λ Ingrosso, Dillon Francis, and Zeds Dead (we could go on) goes to show his wide spectrum of musical taste. Even with all that under his belt, there is even more on the horizon for Valentino Khan. “I’m working on finishing a bunch of new singles and new music,” he reveals. “I can’t wait to get them out to the world!” Watch out for the “Gold” music video coming soon, catch Valentino live on tour (dates below), and check out our full interview with Valentino Khan right here! “Gold” is simply amazing… What was the inspiration behind the track? I wanted to make something that was really like, a good vibe record — danceable and kind of revisit a little bit of the moombahton sound that I started out with. It was cool to be able to do that and work with a legendary artist like Sean Paul, who is incredibly talented in studio both as a vocalist and a writer. “Gold” Out Now: Spotify | Apple Music | YouTube | SoundCloud What was it like working with the Sean Paul? It was really dope working with Sean Paul. He’s really talented in the studio. He didn’t really write anything down when we got in the studio, which was awesome. That really spoke to him being a true artist — just the fact that he’s able to deliver everything on the record off the top of his dome. I thought that was something that really set him apart from a lot of people. He’s a quick worker and overall just a really good dude. We just shot the music video for “Gold” in Jamacia and we hung out a little bit. Awesome! So you guys were physically in the studio together! Yeah, exactly. I’m the kind of guy — I really like being in studio and actually producing the records with the artist whenever its possible. I love being in the studio and being able to navigate and work with the artists, and contribute to it myself in terms of the actual songwriting process. It’s definitely something I take pride in. For fans catching you on tour, what can they expect? I always try to be forward-thinking. I try to play records that the crowd maybe not be familiar with, but I know they’re going to gravitate towards. I’m not going to play anything that’s obscure for the sake of being obscure, but I think it’s cool to play records that they didn’t know they wanted to hear. Once you’re able to do that I think you make a connection with a lot of fanbases out there. What’s your favorite part about touring? It might be a very simple answer, but being able to see all these different cities and get a sense of the vibes in all these different cities. It’s cool to be in different places and find what sets them apart from the rest of the world, whether it’s the food, the people, or even the weather. It’s amazing to be able to transport between all these different settings and be able to take in all these different kinds of environments. Which places do you hope to visit and/or already know you love to visit? The place I would love to play that I haven’t played yet is Brazil. It’s really interesting — the culture — it’s always been a place I would like to travel to eventually. It’s on top of my list. Overall, one of the most interesting places to travel, or play, or just being in general, is Tokyo. I think it’s probably the least boring city in the world. You could go there at any time of day — morning, night, afternoon, it doesn’t matter — and find something to do. The people are amazing, respectful. It’s an awesome culture they have going over there. The “Pump” music video is one of my all time favorites… How did you think up that outlandish concept? The original concept of having the censor blur move around at this naked party was basically just an idea. But then we worked a lot together and talked over the phone to really refine it. I enjoyed being involved in the whole creative process — the creative world beyond just making the music. I think that’s really important, to be giving that creative input Yeah, it was a really awesome concept and I’m glad we were able to bring it to life for an interesting and memorable music video. What effect did “Deep Down Low” have on your career? Did you think it would get as big as it did? I completely think it had a tremendous effect, in a positive way, on my career. And to answer your other question — no, I didn’t think it would be as successful as it was. I thought maybe my peers like Skrillex and Diplo, or someone like that in the bass music world would play it. But then Calvin Harris and Afrojack and Axwell Λ Ingrosso were all huge in playing the record — taking it to a completely different realm and a completely different height. I feel like I owe a lot all those DJs in terms of helping the record blow up. I’m still astonished and thankful and grateful that people are still playing the record out. Hopefully it just becomes one of those house records that lives on and on for years. Some of your favorite labels for up-and-coming artists? Obviously, Mad Decent and OWSLA. I really like listening to Boys Noize’s label, actually. It’s probably different from what I would typically play in my sets, but once in a while I do these weird hard techno sets. You seem to have a lot of DJs friends… Have any of those friendships led to collaborations? I think hanging out with GTA probably helped facilitate us making music together — those guys are just really great dudes. They’re really a great example for how you should conduct yourself as a young producer getting into the game. I’ve known them just getting into the game and they’ve always been humble and have let their music do the talking for them. That’s why I think everybody in our world really respects those guys. They’re just about the art form. Being able to hang out with people that you get along with definitely adds to it. A lot of these friendships spark because it’s like, “Hey, I like your music.” And the other person is like, “Hey, I like your music, too!” If you connect with human beings on top of that it’s a really cool combination. If you had to start a superstar duo with one of the following, who would you choose: Skrillex, Diplo or Dillon Francis? [Laughs] I would maybe choose Diplo just because musically I think we align with each other. All of our sounds and releases are really versatile, and we don’t stick to making one sound over and over. Not that Dillon and Skrillex are like that, because I think both of those guys are incredibly versatile too. Diplo has always been forward thinking and trendsetting in everything he’s done. He’s kind of been all over the place in a good way, in terms of the versatility of his sound. What is Valentino Khan’s mantra? My mantra is kind of what I tell any young producer or DJ that asks me for advice. The two things I say… Be original and work your ass off. I think if you have those two things in place in your life, then eventually the cream will rise to the top and people will take notice of you. It’s just like any other job — it might be a weird job but it’s just like any other. You have to work hard and you have to put in the hours. And you have to be devoted to it. If you’re able to do that, you’ll have a strong level of success. Valentino Khan Live October 27—Sacramento, CA—Fright Night* October 28—San Francisco, CA—Temple Nightclub November 18—Chicago, IL—Aragon Ballroom† November 22—Royal Oak, MI—Royal Oak Music Theatre† November 24—Minneapolis, MN—Skyway Theatre† November 25—San Diego, CA—Bassmnt December 15—Boulder, Co—Boulder Theater† December 21—Baltimore, MD—Rams Head Live!† December 22—Boston, MA—House of Blues† December 23—New York, NY—Terminal 5† *with Diplo and Excision †with NGHTMRE Photo Credit: Pete Don This article was first published on Your EDM. Source: Your EDM Interview: Valentino Khan Talks Touring, Success, Sean Paul, & All Things “Gold” Source: YourEDM
  4. Tomorrow marks the return of the critically acclaimed Netflix show Stranger Things. While you queue up your account to watch the new season, check out the show’s soundtrack on Spotify for an awesome easter egg. Composed by Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein of the band S U R V I V E, the Stranger Things soundtrack is incredible. Now, when playing the soundtrack on the Spotify desktop or mobile apps, a great effect occurs. An overlay darkens the screen and adds a moving flashlight beam and falling spores, taking the listener straight into The Upside Down. But, if you move your mouse or touch your phone screen, the easter egg disappears. It’s a neat visual easter egg, hyping us more for the second season. In other Spotify/Stranger Things news, you can now check out official playlists based on several of the show’s characters. Head to the Spotify/Stranger Things page and the streaming service will analyze your listening habits. Then, you will find out which character you match with. Each playlist features songs inspired by their character, including psychedelic jams for Dustin and death metal ragers for the Demogorgon. Hype levels: through the ceiling. This article was first published on Your EDM. Source: Discover This Awesome Stranger Things Easter Egg and These Character Playlists on Spotify Source: Your EDM
  5. Even though summer is so close we can practically smell it, we’ve been in such dire need of a festival fix we couldn’t help but want to see what all the fuss surrounding Amsterdam Dance Event, held October 18-22, is all about. When a festival has been running for 22 years and draws a record crowd of 395,000 people with practically every top dance music artist you could name on the line-up, it’s easy to suffer from pangs of FOMO. The desire to blow the savings and max out the credit card with a last minute return flight to Amsterdam was just far too tempting. So in the name of ‘techno’, we decided to do just that — here’s what we learned at ADE 2017. #1 Zombie Nation’s Kernkraft 400 still stands the test of time Especially when Kölsch and Joris Voorn decide to drop the retro hit that took 1999 dancefloors by storm during a back-to-back open-close set. Yes the crowd went wild, yes we got a tad excited too. Hot off his mind blowing Eiffel Tower live stream and latest album release 1989, Kölsch proved why he’s an artist at the top of his game and that he really can play anything, especially when he teams up with Dutch legend Joris Voorn. What a party! #2 The venues at ADE are as impressive as the festival line-up Paradiso is arguably Amsterdam’s most famous venue built out of an 18th century church. Complete with large Gothic style glass windows, the club plays host to some of the best parties in town including the ADE Sunday night closing party with Louie Vega, Francois K and Joey Negro. This place is a must stop on any raver’s Amsterdam agenda. Venues like De School boast more than just a 24-hour license but also all the amenities you’d expect to find in a former technical school including a gym, restaurant, café, exhibition and concert space. Packed practically every minute of ADE, this was one of the harder venues to get into, but well worth the reward once inside. NDSM Scheepsbouwloods set in a former ship building yard is one of the largest club spaces we’ve ever seen – holy smokes it’s HUGE! Featuring sky high ceilings and an interior that appears to have barely been touched since 1946, the space has subtly been converted into an epic state of the art nightlife venue. Taking over the ginormous space on the Saturday night, Michael Mayers’ Kompakt Records’ sold out party was one for the books with Patrice Bäumel, Pachanga Boys and plenty more talented tastemakers taking to the decks. And more to the point, where else but Amsterdam can you go and see one of the biggest dance music acts on the planet such as Underworld play for free in the world class Rijksmuseum? #3 You can do ADE on a budget Flying from Australia to Europe is never cheap, even when you get a cracking deal, but some of the best times at ADE can be had for free. Yes, the $684 AUD festival and conference pass is indeed pricey, but consider buying single event tickets or hitting up any number of the free events taking place throughout the city. From record stores to cosy corner bars and markets, many of them are putting on some pretty awesome parties with top-notch line-ups and often free booze or well-priced happy hours. Some of our favourite ADE moments were spent checking out Job Jobse throw down disco in a tiny record store, or Something Happening Somewhere label head Nuno Dos Santos playing alongside talented Dutch producer Love Over Entropy to a crowd of 30 in a local Amsterdam bar. This is also probably the best chance you have of getting up close and personal with your favorite acts like, say, Richie Hawtin — who, believe it or not, played a totally casual free pop-up gig at the Nieuwmarkt market on opening night. #4 The Amsterdam clubbing scene is giving Berlin a run for its money Not sure if it’s just us, but when we can walk up to a club and the door person actually cracks a smile, we get a bit weak at the knees. After being thrown shade and attitude one too many times at the door of famous Berlin clubs like Berghain or Ritter Butze, it’s nice to be treated like a human for once. Yes, a night out in Amsterdam is more expensive than its German competitor, but the quality of venues and party lineups that the city is producing is impressive to say the least. Watch out Berlin, Amsterdam is calling. #5 Aussies are getting the love they deserve When Steve Ward brought his Chameleon Recordings to ADE in 2014, Australia arrived in Amsterdam with a bang. Leading the way of the Aussie underground sound in 2017, DJs like Tornado Wallace (aka Lewie Day) and Defected Records’ Sonny Fodera are helping put Australia firmly on the underground dance music map. With so many rising stars hailing from the land Down Under like HAAi, Harvey Sutherland and Dreems making a name for themselves overseas (note: they didn’t play ADE but we’re gunning for them for next year!), we are beyond excited to see Aussie talent getting the recognition it deserves. This year at ADE there were 15 Australian artists on the official lineup and we’d love more than anything to see this double in 2018. — Isabel Thomson-Officer is a freelance writer. She is on Twitter. — Article image by Max Kneefel The post 5 things we learned at this year’s Amsterdam Dance Event appeared first on inthemix. Source: InTheMix
  6. Even though summer is so close we can practically smell it, we’ve been in such dire need of a festival fix we couldn’t help but want to see what all the fuss surrounding Amsterdam Dance Event, held October 18-22, is all about. When a festival has been running for 22 years and draws a record crowd of 395,000 people with practically every top dance music artist you could name on the line-up, it’s easy to suffer from pangs of FOMO. The desire to blow the savings and max out the credit card with a last minute return flight to Amsterdam was just far too tempting. So in the name of ‘techno’, we decided to do just that — here’s what we learned at ADE 2017. #1 Zombie Nation’s Kernkraft 400 still stands the test of time Especially when Kölsch and Joris Voorn decide to drop the retro hit that took 1999 dancefloors by storm during a back-to-back open-close set. Yes the crowd went wild, yes we got a tad excited too. Hot off his mind blowing Eiffel Tower live stream and latest album release 1989, Kölsch proved why he’s an artist at the top of his game and that he really can play anything, especially when he teams up with Dutch legend Joris Voorn. What a party! #2 The venues at ADE are as impressive as the festival line-up Paradiso is arguably Amsterdam’s most famous venue built out of an 18th century church. Complete with large Gothic style glass windows, the club plays host to some of the best parties in town including the ADE Sunday night closing party with Louie Vega, Francois K and Joey Negro. This place is a must stop on any raver’s Amsterdam agenda. Venues like De School boast more than just a 24-hour license but also all the amenities you’d expect to find in a former technical school including a gym, restaurant, café, exhibition and concert space. Packed practically every minute of ADE, this was one of the harder venues to get into, but well worth the reward once inside. NDSM Scheepsbouwloods set in a former ship building yard is one of the largest club spaces we’ve ever seen – holy smokes it’s HUGE! Featuring sky high ceilings and an interior that appears to have barely been touched since 1946, the space has subtly been converted into an epic state of the art nightlife venue. Taking over the ginormous space on the Saturday night, Michael Mayers’ Kompakt Records’ sold out party was one for the books with Patrice Bäumel, Pachanga Boys and plenty more talented tastemakers taking to the decks. And more to the point, where else but Amsterdam can you go and see one of the biggest dance music acts on the planet such as Underworld play for free in the world class Rijksmuseum? #3 You can do ADE on a budget Flying from Australia to Europe is never cheap, even when you get a cracking deal, but some of the best times at ADE can be had for free. Yes, the $684 AUD festival and conference pass is indeed pricey, but consider buying single event tickets or hitting up any number of the free events taking place throughout the city. From record stores to cosy corner bars and markets, many of them are putting on some pretty awesome parties with top-notch line-ups and often free booze or well-priced happy hours. Some of our favourite ADE moments were spent checking out Job Jobse throw down disco in a tiny record store, or Something Happening Somewhere label head Nuno Dos Santos playing alongside talented Dutch producer Love Over Entropy to a crowd of 30 in a local Amsterdam bar. This is also probably the best chance you have of getting up close and personal with your favorite acts like, say, Richie Hawtin — who, believe it or not, played a totally casual free pop-up gig at the Nieuwmarkt market on opening night. #4 The Amsterdam clubbing scene is giving Berlin a run for its money Not sure if it’s just us, but when we can walk up to a club and the door person actually cracks a smile, we get a bit weak at the knees. After being thrown shade and attitude one too many times at the door of famous Berlin clubs like Berghain or Ritter Butze, it’s nice to be treated like a human for once. Yes, a night out in Amsterdam is more expensive than its German competitor, but the quality of venues and party lineups that the city is producing is impressive to say the least. Watch out Berlin, Amsterdam is calling. #5 Aussies are getting the love they deserve When Steve Ward brought his Chameleon Recordings to ADE in 2014, Australia arrived in Amsterdam with a bang. Leading the way of the Aussie underground sound in 2017, DJs like Tornado Wallace (aka Lewie Day) and Defected Records’ Sonny Fodera are helping put Australia firmly on the underground dance music map. With so many rising stars hailing from the land Down Under like HAAi, Harvey Sutherland and Dreems making a name for themselves overseas (note: they didn’t play ADE but we’re gunning for them for next year!), we are beyond excited to see Aussie talent getting the recognition it deserves. This year at ADE there were 15 Australian artists on the official lineup and we’d love more than anything to see this double in 2018. — Isabel Thomson-Officer is a freelance writer. She is on Twitter. — Article image by Max Kneefel The post 5 things we learned at this year’s Amsterdam Dance Event appeared first on inthemix. Source: Junkee
  7. It’s that time of year… all Halloween everything, pumpkin spice lattes, and Stranger Things season 2! Days ahead of the highly anticipated Netflix original series’ season 2 debut we have the entire soundtrack from SURVIVE. It’s just as eerie and ominous as expected, but somehow completely exceeds what we hoped for the score of the show. The synthy sounds of SURVIVE set the scene for a thrilling season of Stranger Things, with little glimmers of audible hopefulness that promise some light in all the darkness of The Upside Down. Those looking for wonder and mystery should listen to “Walkin in Hawkins.” Those wanting a good scare should check out “Descent into the Rift.” Songs like “Looking for A Way Out” and “It’s A Trap” offer some dark, edgy, soundscapes, while “Run” unexpectedly provides a way out. Honestly, any fan of the show should just let this full album play out because it’s awesome in its entirety. Stranger Things season 2 debuts Friday, October 27, with all nine episodes hitting Netflix at 3:01 am EST / 12:01 am PST — so get ready! Stranger Things 2 Soundtrack Image via Netflix This article was first published on Your EDM. Source: Listen to the Eerie Sounds of the ‘Stranger Things 2’ Soundtrack from SURVIVE Source: Your EDM
  8. The Stranger Things cast sat down with Emmy Magazine after season one wrapped up, where they revealed that the next season would be “a lot more horror-oriented.” Season two of the Netflix hit show arrives on October 27, just in time for Halloween, and is set to consist of just 9 episodes. In anticipation of the impending continuation of the new age cult classic, synth-led S U R V I V E has released the Kyle Dixon and Michael Stein led soundtrack. S U R V I V E confirmed in an interview with The Vinyl Factory earlier in the fall that, “things are going to be a bit darker and weirder,” as the characters “are going to spend a little more time in the Upside Down.” Fortunately, the band has delivered on the aforementioned and simultaneously found a more texturized means of sonic expression. They’ve added more modular synths, in turn adding, even more, depth and layers into the mix. Certainly, in its 34 tracks, at over one hour long, the two hint a much darker season will arrive in no time.       Read More: Get a first look at the ‘Stranger Things’ season two soundtrack Warp the ‘Stranger Things’ theme with this online synth site S U R V I V E wins Emmy for ‘Stranger Things’ theme Source: Dancing Astronaut
  9. Hey Spoontech, how is it going? Let’s start from the beginning: in 2010 Spoontech was born. Can you tell us some more about the birth of the label. What does the name Spoontech mean? “Hello Hard News, we’re all good and thank you for having us! The name Spoontech does not have any particular meaning, but is the result of the weird brains of our founders Vazard & Delete! They thought that the name was a cool way to start our massive marketing efforts, as everybody owns and can relate to spoons…” What makes the label so different than all the others? “We don’t take ourselves all that seriously. But we’ve always been dedicated to releasing tracks that are one of a kind. When we started out in 2010 there were only a few labels that were releasing tracks on the “harder” side of Hardstyle, so we wanted to create our own platform for artists with their own unique style that didn’t fit the mainstream.” Which artists were involved in the very beginning? “In the very beginning of Spoontech we had artists such as Regain, Delete, Digital Abuse, Warface, Dark Pact, Enigmato and Prefix & Density releasing on the label. The two oldest residents are Vazard and Hardstyle Mafia, who are still with us today almost 7 years later. We love that sense of connectedness we have with our past and present artists as we started producing and growing together at the same time.” The last couple of years there were quite a few artists who joined and left the label. Which artists joined the team and why do they fit the label? “The latest additions to our roster are Unkind, Vyral & The Purge. Right before them there were Infirium, Mind Dimension and D-Verze. All of them are a group of producers that we feel represent the ‘Spoontech-sound’ perfectly. They range all the way from the “raw” and a little industrialized sounds, to the melodic and more emotional spectrum of Hardstyle, while all having their own unique styles.” From the beginning it was instantly clear that you started a brand new movement with the label in the hardstyle scene. Fans felt connected straight away with Spoontech. Why is that? “Well, Spoontech was a fresh breeze during a time where the euphoric Hardstyle had a huge market share. It was a label where music enthusiasts could find music influenced by the earlier days of Hardstyle. We think that since it started out quite small we had, and still have, a dedicated fanbase that are connected through the love of the cozy “indie” feeling of the label. Making all of us feel close to each other in a special way!” And what’s the reason behind the success? “Although we got a big push since we ended up in the middle of the “Rawstyle” hype that commenced around 2013, we have very much stuck to our original mindset. The fact that we haven’t been chasing trends is probably the reason why we haven’t skyrocketed, but acquired a steady growth instead. A quick rise to the top is something that we’re not really aiming for because we’re a small group working with the label in our free time, simply because we love this music so much.” If you had to name one highlight throughout the years on the label, what would it be? “We’ve had so many amazing moments with our fans, but one highlight that stands out most would be the 5 year celebration of the label in Club Rodenburg. This was a turning point in a way for the label when most of the label’s artists as well as fans came together. This showed just how big the following of the label had become in Europe and paved the way for where we are right now.” You made quite a name for yourselves in just a short amount of time. But we’ve noticed that things got a little bit quiet around you guys lately. Is this a misunderstanding or what’s going on? “It’s not a misunderstanding, the reason for all this is that the past year or so a lot of things have happened inside the label. Stewart (Vazard) decided to step down as the manager of the label and handed this over to John (half of Main Concern). At the same time Gijs (Infirium) has taken over Ryan’s (Delete) role as the mastering engineer and Rick (D-Verze) joined the management team as a planner. Stewart and Ryan are still part of the label but more in the background. But with all these changes it’s taken some time for us to get things running smoothly.” Pioneers like Delete and Warface left the label a few years back and after that they climbed their ways to the top. Has this something to do with the radio silence around Spoontech? “We wouldn’t like to call it radio silence and we hope that it hasn’t been that bad haha…However, like you say we’ve had some artists leaving such as Delete, Warface and most recently Main Concern. Of course this affects us, like it would to any label. New and younger artists need time to make a name for themselves in the scene. So along with getting the new management team together we’ve also focused a lot on the growth of our artists. Hence, a little less presence online and on major events. However, we did have artists playing at events such as Defqon, Decibel, Loudfest and XXlerator, just to name a few, during 2017. Also, in the near future we will launch some very exciting new projects, so stay tuned!” Most of your fans are based in The Netherlands and the headquarters of Spoontech is in Australia. That’s over 16.660 kilometers away from the core of your label, how do you think that has affected you? “This has affected us in different ways, not only negative we’d say. In the beginning it didn’t really matter that the founders, Vazard & Delete, were both residing so far away from the action in Europe. When the label kept growing the fact of the long distance became more pressing, with more European bookings but also the struggle of managing a business with a huge part of it focusing on the other side of the world. But now with the new management team in place and all of us living in Europe, the headquarters are closer to the action. Positive aspects to this situation would be that the label had a different approach than most labels in Europe or The Netherlands in particular. The last couple of years the label has also gained more attention in Australia which is amazing to see, giving both Vazard & Delete the credit they deserve on home soil!” Lots of new labels entered the hardstyle scene lately. Do you think this is a good thing or has the amount of labels reached it’s limit? “This is a tricky question as the labels are focusing on different sounds of Hardstyle. We’ve noticed that what we’re requesting from an artist is occasionally hard to find, sometimes other labels manage to recruit an artist that we feel would’ve been a good fit for us. So at times it feels like it is because of the amount of labels, but it might also just be that the majority of producers aren’t fitting our label and that’s why we struggle finding prospects. Or, it’s just that we have to dig deeper and up our game when it comes to scouting! To answer your question; we think it’s a mix of good and bad at the same time!” This summer at Fatality we noticed that Spoontech and Gearbox Digital get along very well. Do you also work together with them or any other label? “We definitely get along well, and the past years infected debate online between the two fan groups does definitely not represent how we feel about each other. As a label, as well as many of our artists, we’ve been working with Gearbox for a long time now. Theracords is also a label that we’ve had good contact with throughout the years!” If you had to name your biggest competitor label, which label would it be and why? “Well the word ‘competitor’ can sometimes get a negative tone to it, like if it would be an enemy. But we don’t really see it that way. Our biggest competitors inspire us and keep us on our toes through motivation. We have many competitors but the closest would be Gearbox and Theracords, they are also the ones that we are closest to in terms of relations. We’ve learned a lot from them! We don’t see it as if we fight about the customers, most of our fans are also fans of those labels and what they can’t find from us and our artists they find in theirs.” Speaking of Fatality, last year you had your own Spoontech area at the raw festival. First of all, how was it? “It was everything we could’ve hoped for and more. We had a beautiful stage on the beach and for the most part of the day the sun was out. The atmosphere was like always amazing and it was also the first time all the Spoontechnicians were together.” Is a hosting like that something you would like to do more often? “Definitely, we do want to keep the concept of hostings to a restricted amount each year though. We know that many of our followers are screaming for more Spoontech events but we would like to make sure it’s a special moment once it happens. We hope you all understand this!” Let’s talk about the future. Where do you see yourselves in 5 years? “Oh wow…that job interview anxiety just hit us haha. We hope that in 5 years we are still true to our roots in the eyes of our fans. That we are still a collective that works together to represent the Spoontech sound and, most importantly, that we all have a lot of fun!” We’ve seen some teasers of what looks like a new Spoontech project on your social channels lately, can you give us some information what that is about? “Well, it’s an exciting new project that’s been involving the whole label. We talked about a collective in the previous question and this project has really put that to a test. All the artists were given a mission to collaborate with another Spoontechnician, which most of them had never worked with before. Then they were given 3 keywords that should represent the track as well as the overall theme of the whole concept, then the experimentation began. We think it’s important to challenge our artists creative minds and also get them to work with artists that’s not in their top of mind to work with. Apart from the artists we also worked closely with our amazing designer, “ReeceDesign”, to create the graphics for the whole project. All in all it’s been a huge collaboration between everyone in the Spoontech collective and we can’t wait to hear what everyone else thinks of it!” Do you have any other plans for the future? (Involving artists, releases, albums, festivals etc.) “We are moving fast towards the end of 2017 but before that we will have a few heavy releases, alongside the mini album mentioned above. We also have two artists releasing albums in the near future! In terms of events we will work with some Dutch organizers this winter where you can find most of our artists! What we have in store for 2018 we cannot tell you just yet, but we have a feeling it will make up for the recent quietness.” Thank you for your time! The post Interview with Spoontech: “A lot of things happened inside the label” is visible on Hard News. http://www.hardnews.nl/en
  10. The soundtrack will be released on both vinyl and cassette later this year Continue reading... Source: MixMag
  11. Make sure to collect your Eggo waffles Continue reading... http://mixmag.net
  12. The performance will take place on October 27 at Brixton Electric Continue reading... http://mixmag.net
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